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Fall 2016 Term I Classrooms

doorWelcome to Fall!  REMEMBER THAT CLASSES START NEXT WEEK, the week of August 29!

  1. Do you have your syllabus?
  2. Do you have your textbook?
  3. Have you prepared your first night’s assignment (see syllabus)?

See below for classrooms.

Looking forward to seeing you next week!

Day AUGUST 29 –  OCTOBER 15 Labor Day 9/5/16
Mon HSP2221-08 SENIOR SEMINAR – MADDEN Cuvilly 1
HSP2203-08 COMMUNICATION SKILLS – DAVIS WICK Cuvilly 23
Tues HSP2218-08 SOCIAL RESEARCH METHODS – ARBORE Cuvilly 1
REL2250-08 RELIGIONS OF THE WORLD – LIPOWITZ SM 204
CANADA PSY2180-08 HIST/SYSTEMS OF PSYCH – NYLAND Bldg 5, Room 223
CANADA BUS2008-08 LEGAL ENVIRONMENT OF BUS – LADINE Bldg 5, Room 227
Wed  ENG2624-08 CHILDREN’S LIT – VISSER KNOTH Cuvilly 21
CUL2124-08 MODERN FRANCE – LAROCHE DAVIS SM 208
BUS2224-08 CORP FINANCE – HUA Cuvilly 22
HSP2227-08 MARKETING FOR NPO’s – BARSI Cuvilly 7
PSY2101-08 PERSONALITY THEORY – NYLAND Gavin Hall 2
MISSION BUS2006-08 PROFESSIONAL WRITING – STREICHER MT 18B
HSP2218-10 SOCIAL RESEARCH METHODS – ARBORE MT 18A
Thur BUS2600-08 OPERATIONS AND INFO TECH SYS –  FREEMAN Cuvilly 6
BUS2048 HUMAN RESOURCE MGMT – MADDEN Cuvilly 1
on-line BUS1100-08 MACROECONOMICS – VERMA  (on-line)
Sat REL2620-08 WAY OF THE EARTH – ASHLEY 10AM – 2PM Cuvilly 7
BUS2079-08 – WKPL COACH  SANTAMARIA  SEPT 17 9AM – 4PM SM 113

Graduation Spring 2016

We didn’t get everyone’s photos, but love the ones we could get!  Congratulations, Human Services and Intensive Business students!

Go Giants! How Workplace Culture Carries the Day

GiantsThis is a great article about the importance of workplace culture, using the SF Giants as an example.  Here is a teaser:

The San Francisco Giants are going to baseball’s World Series for the third time in five years. And a big reason why is the team’s workplace culture — a culture that organizations beyond baseball can learn from.

The Giants are a “teamy” team, one with heaps of solidarity, ego-sacrifice and brotherly love. That workplace climate, sometimes called “chemistry,” has helped make the Giants a talent magnet, prepared them to overcome major adversity, and propelled them to their sport’s biggest stage again.

“We’ve just got a bunch of guys who have come together,” Giants third base coach Tim Flannery said after the team won their National League pennant series over the St. Louis Cardinals. “And there’s something magic that happens in this clubhouse.””

So, you are a Giant’s fan and salute the results of their strong culture.  When the World Series is over, what can you do to build a “Giants culture” in your workplace, making it  stronger, more effective, more enjoyable?  Some additional quotes about the importance of culture in leading organizations from the Giant’s to major tech firms to ponder:

“Everybody cares about each other in this organization.”

“We’re all in this together.”

“You can count on people to cooperate.”

Is that true in your workplace?  What actions could you take to make it true?  What actions could other leaders at higher levels take?

 

Image courtesy pinterest.com

 

Classrooms

Welcome back

Welcome back!  You can find your classroom assignments below and syllabi at this link.

Don’t forget to rsvp for the 25th Anniversary of the PSP Program (Human Services and Evening Business), coming up on Friday, March 21.  A great opportunity to network with alumni and see your favorite instructors.

See you soon….

Monday

Business Policy/Barden: CU 1

Contemporary Professional Writing/Larragoiti/SM207

Human Relations in Organizations/Davis Wick/CU 11

 

Tuesday

Financial Analysis/Modeling/Hua/CU6

Human Services/DavisWick/CU1

Islam: Faith & Practice/Lipowitz/SM207

Managing Cultural Diversity/Madden/CU22

Prof Ethics and Social Responsibility/CU23

 

Tuesday at Canada

Operations and Info Tech Systems/Freeman/5-227

History of Systems of Psychology/Nyland/5-221

 

Wednesday

Legal Environment of Business/Freeman/CU1

Children’s Literature/Harrison/CU7

French Cinema/LarocheDavis/SM208

 

Wednesday at Canada

Women’s Spirituality/Lipowitz/5-223

 

Wednesday at Mission

Marketing for NonProfits/Barsi/MT18A

 

Thursday

Counseling Skills/Arbore/CU1

Human Services Financial Management/Kaplan/CU22

Philosophy of Science/Rende/SM203

Entrepreneurial Marketing and Mangement/Tau/CU23

Linguistics/Larragoiti/SM118

 

Saturday

Way of the Earth/Matevia/CU23

Leadership Strengths/Santamaria/CU6

 

Image courtesy myniceprofile.com

 

Leadership Friday

rain

Happy rainy Friday!  Hope that you have cozy plans for the weekend and that you and your loved ones stay safe!

Today’s topic for discussion (please share your thoughts!) relates to leadership vulnerability.  Blogger and HR Exec Carol Anderson writes about this in the context of authenticity, trustworthiness, and more.  You can read the entirety of her blog post here and what follows is an excerpt to pique your interest:

 

How is a Leader Deemed Trustworthy?

“How is a leader deemed trustworthy? By being authentic. By being real. By being truthful. Always.  How is a leader’s ability trusted? By demonstrating that the leader can face the biggest challenges with competence, confidence and integrity.

Why don’t more leaders see this? Why don’t more leaders do this?  One hypothesis is that leaders don’t feel that they have permission to be vulnerable or to be wrong.

In 1991, Chris Argyris, Professor Emeritus at Harvard Business School, published an article titled, “Teaching Smart People to Learn.” In it he explored why some of the smartest people he studied were unable to learn, unwilling to make mistakes, and defensive upon receiving feedback. He said,

“There seems to be a universal human tendency to design one’s actions consistently according to four basic values: 1. To remain in unilateral control; 2. To maximize “winning” and minimize “losing”; 3. To suppress negative feelings; and 4. To be as “rational” as possible – by which people mean defining clear objectives and evaluating their behavior in terms of whether or not they have achieved them.”

He called this the “doom loop” – successful professionals fear failure, and do anything and everything in their power to avoid it, thus losing the valuable opportunity to learn and grow.

Humble InquirySeeking Humility

Edgar Schein, the father of the concept of organizational culture and MIT Professor Emeritus, recently published a new book called “Humble Inquiry.” His premise – status and culture make speaking up to those in positions of power very difficult, so the individual in the position of power must ask. The asking must be done in such a way that it engenders trust, and the only way to do that is to be sincerely interested in what the other person has to say. In order to do that, the person in power has to allow him/herself to appear vulnerable to the lower ranking individual.”

 

 

What do you think?  Have you worked with leaders who have been able to model vulnerability, exhibit a willingness to learn, admit mistakes, and grow?  How do you demonstrate these qualities in the leadership roles that you assume?

 

Images courtesy rainterra.net and amazon.com

Reminders: Novelist Event and Class Registration

cw

Tonight!  Thursday, February 20 at 7:30, San Francisco novelist K.M. Soehnlein will be reading at Wiegand Gallery.  Reception to follow.  These are wonderful events, interesting, informative…  and free.  Flyer attached!

 

 

registerAlso, do you need a term II class?  Come see your adviser today (or email us directly for an appointment): classes begin again the week of March 10:

Human Services:  Judy King (jking@ndnu.edu) or Therese Madden (tmadden@ndnu.edu)

Intensive Business:  Vicki Silver (vsilver@ndnu.edu) or Lillian Barden (lbarden@ndnu.edu)

Summer/Fall registration will begin on March 17; stay tuned for more information about how to register.

Images courtesy fccc.wy.edu;

Why Bring a Child Into this World?

This is a lovely short film by an international corporate giant.  From the comments, many are cynical about its intent for marketing and the less-than-perfect actions of the corporation that made it.  Such analysis is important, but behind the message lies hope and optimism and we definitely also need those. 

The message resonates with the projects students recently completed in our Creativity and Work class.  Looking at the creativity and innovations occurring in the classroom and around the world is incredibly hopeful, exciting, and inspiring.  So, rather than judging the pros and cons of the corporation that creates this short film, it might be more interesting to examine what we are each doing to contribute to the world so that our children will experience more hope and opportunity.

If you get a chance to review this and comment,

let us know: what inspires you?